Eng’s Noodle House Singapore – Photo Essay

Eng’s Noodle House Singapore – Photo Essay

I think I am getting island fever.  I love living here in Bali, and generally praise the food, but anytime a foodie lives in a small town, at some point they itch to try something new.  They think about what is missing from the local food scene. They fantasize about food. I have yet to have noodle hallucinations, but I do miss some of the great Chinese food we have had in places like Singapore and Kuala Lumpur.  Considering we have two more months before we leave the island on our first visa run in six months, I am left salivating over photos of Eng’s Noodle House in Singapore.  It did not help that our Singaporean friend, Leigh, was visiting last week, and was tempting us with offers of exploring more of Singapores famous food stalls. We visited Eng’s several times during our trips to Singapore, as it is a short walk from where we were house sitting for George and Daisy.  It was not our intended destination that first night.  We tried to go to a strange sort of hawker center, which had a pleasant Thai pork dish we had the day before.  Unfortunately, the stall was closed, as were most of the other stalls in the food court.  Deflated, we started to walk back towards the house, while trying to find an alternative for dinner.  Eric had his heart set on that pork, though. As we walked the busy street, we were drawn in by the simple sign, and the even simpler menu at Eng’s Noodle House Singapore on Tajong Katong.  The place was also pretty packed, which...
ITB Asia and WTM London for Bloggers

ITB Asia and WTM London for Bloggers

Leaving Bali, in hindsight, may have been a mistake.  When we left, I was on a high.  I was healthier than I had been in years, and we had really found our groove – new friends, a new routine.  We were being productive and had settled in nicely. Then.  We left. We left so that: 1) I could attend TBEX Dublin, the conference for travel bloggers; 2) we both could attend ITB Asia in Singapore, a large travel industry conference; and 3) we could both attend World Travel Market in London, one of the largest travel conferences in the world.  It was two months of travel, with the express purpose of conducting “business.”   For Eric, who is selling advertising on a contract basis for a couple travel websites, this seemed like a no-brainer.  A chance for him to network and make contacts that might prove fruitful.  For me, though, as a travel blogger, I was unsure why I was going to these conferences, and what I hoped to get from it.  I had no clear plan, other than show up, smile, and carry business cards. ITB Asia in Singapore ITB Asia brands itself as one of the leading B2B conferences for the Asian travel market.  The goal is to provide a forum for buyers and sellers to meet, introduce themselves, and sign deals. What the what?  What does this mean for travel bloggers? What is a Travel Buyer? There were over 800 exhibitors at ITB Asia in Singapore.  After only a handful of tables offered at TBEX Dublin, the number seemed overwhelming at first.  The majority of the...
An Addiction to Portuguese Egg Tarts – A Photo Essay

An Addiction to Portuguese Egg Tarts – A Photo Essay

One of our first nights in Singapore, we made our way to a small but dysfunctional food center up the road from our housesitting apartment.  We found fantastic fried pork at a Thai stall, that never seemed to be open again.  As we walked our way back, we happened upon Madeline’s Portuguese egg tarts.  Having fallen in love with these in Lisbon last year, we stopped for two.  The old Amber and Eric would have bought a half dozen, but two would do it for the new, healthier Amber and Eric. The woman, who I assumed was named Madeline, offered us two straight from the oven.  They were delicious.  A warm, flaky crust was filled with creamy, sweet custard, a little flambéed on the top.  We became addicted.   Next thing you know, we were on an egg custard a day diet for the full week in Singapore.  And, we did not discriminate.  If Portuguese egg tarts were not available, we quickly substituted with Chinese egg tarts, which are similar but without the flambé on the top. Luckily, you can find them everywhere in Singapore.  You know what they say, “an egg tart a day…” In the end, Madeline’s were our favorite:   Our Chinese substitution: What was that about a new, healthier...
Housesitting in Singapore for Two Fun Pups

Housesitting in Singapore for Two Fun Pups

I have been a member of two housesitting websites for about a year now: Mind My House and Trusted Housesitters.  For those of you unfamiliar with the concept, almost 95% of housesits are really pet sitting opportunities.  People head out on vacation and rather than board their pets, they find someone to watch them in their home.  The housesitter gets free housing, the home owner gets someone to watch their dogs, cats, birds, goats, horses, etc.  It’s a win win. Each site charges a nominal fee, and with each we have been entirely unsuccessful.  Part of this is because of the sheer number of listings in the US, UK, Ireland, and Australia, not areas that we tend to hang out in.  When housesits become available in Asia, we have applied, but generally don’t get the housesit.  Or, the dates have not worked for us.  We came close, though, to ending up with a three month sit in Vanuata.  Google a photo.  Not a shabby place to live for free for a few months.  We made it to the top 5, but were not accepted.   For the most part though, we have not been as successful as some other bloggers, who are experts in the area of housesitting, and use it to offset the expense of long term travel. Regardless of the number of emails I have received without a single housesit, I continue to read the emails every day.  One morning I receive my daily email of new housesitting opportunities, and I saw a picture I recognized.  Two dachshunds named George and Daisy were in need of care...

Singapore for Foodies – a Visa Run or Food Run?

A 60 day Indonesian visa will only get you so far.  It is fairly straight forward to extend, but costs about $60 a person for another 30 days and involves a strange process of getting a letter from a local, with a copy of their identification, and having them vouch for you financially.  Although it was a possibility, we looked for a more exotic way to continue our stay in Bali. We monitored the Air Asia website, and found a a great deal on a visa run to Singapore.  The flight was about $65 round trip, and although we had to pay $25 for a visa on arrival when we returned to Bali, it seemed well worth it.  After all, we had been detoxing, eating healthy, and were starting to tire of the Balinese cuisine.  Where better to cure all these ailments then one of the food capitals of Southeast Asia?  We were even able to snag our first Couchsurfing gig (albeit through an introduction from a friend). We have been to Singapore a few times in the past, with our friend Laura indoctrinating us to the food culture, introducing us to Din Tai Fung and Donut Factory donuts.  We have explored some of the tastiest hawker center treats.  And, trust me, Singapore is for foodies. For this trip, I took it as a personal challenge – how can we eat all of our favorites, and try some new dishes, and stuff ourselves silly in about 48 hours? Gluttony is my favorite sin.  We ate our old standbys, like BBQ sting ray and chicken rice, which is probably the...